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  • New to programming
    I have absolutely NO idea what I'm doing. But I'm really interested in programming, but I want some more knowledge before I get into a class next year. Any helpful tips?
    cabclint5 posted this question on 1/9/15 | java, programming
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  • Take a look at www.freecodecamp.com/ They'll assign you a bunch of tutorials, then send you back here (once you have the skills necessary) to do the challenges.
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  • If you seriously want to learn and pursue it as a career or even a serious hobbyist, then you need to put consistent time and effort into it. Just like everything else in life, you need to work at it. You don't necessarily have to love it, but you got to enjoy doing it and have a certain level of passion. Like many people said, check out codeacademy.com. Also, check out codeschool.com and udacity.com. Some of the lessons in codeschool is free and everything else is a flat rate of $29 a month. I prefer codeschool over codeacademy. Udacity is more in depth and comes with certifications that can help you land a job (without a degree). Udacity has almost every programming language, concepts, and best practices courses. Java, JS, Python, Ruby, HTML, CSS, Mobile Dev, Front end, back end, data analyst, etc. Everything that a self learner needs is FREE there. The lessons and quizzes are free, which is all you need if you want to learn on your own. The only thing that isn't free ($200 a month) is if you want a one-on-one coach or a certificate. There is also eloquentjavascript.net This FREE book covers almost every aspect of js and is very fun to read. It comes with an interactive editor and interpreter. It is recommended by top companies and schools for their seasoned programmers and staff. Some other resources are stackoverflow.com, teamtreehouse.com, udemy.com, coursera.com, and edx.org. Lastly, check out some coding bootcamps if you want to become a world class beginner. They are 8 to 16 week intensive programs. The Harvard of them all is Hack Reactor. The other top ones are App Academy, DevBootcamp, General Asembley, Makers Square, Flat Iron School, and HackBright Academy (for women only). If you want to attend university for a CS major, heavily consider these bootcamps. The most expensive and the most prestigious one is Hack Reactor which costs $17,800 (that's a semester's tuition for most colleges). Most others are around 10k-15k. App Academy is free at first then %18 of your first year salary. After 3 months, you will get a job somewhere around or above a six figures (in the bay area or NYC). Their job placement rate is %99 (Hack Reactor). Some of their graduates write programming books. Some start their own startups. Some of those startups have had traction and funding already. And most work for the best tech companies in the world. I don't want to be biased, but if you're thinking of getting a degree I think it is a waste of time (unless you want the social aspect and other perks of college). If you truly want to learn, you have to write a lot of code everyday. I attended Penn State University. And then dropped out because i thought it was a waste of money for a biology degree that wasn't gonna help me pursue my dreams. I had my fair share of party life, too. Don't just listen to me or others that give you an opinion. Gather every feedback and make your own decision based on your OWN needs. Talk to many seasoned programmers and software engineers. You will soon find out that %99 of what they have learned were through self-education, on the job, on a team project, creating small apps, etc. I started doing all of codeschool and codeacademy JS track. I did python of Udacity. I read through the first 5 chapters of Eloqunet JS. And now I believe I am at %20 capacity as a coder. I have an interview with Hack Reactor and App Academy next week. I started my coding journey about two months ago. What was I doing two months ago? Selling carpets as college drop pout (again Penn State Bio major)! How much did I know as a coder two months ago? Nothing. 0!!! When I say NOTHING, I mean NOTHING! I started doing coderbyte problems 2 weeks ago. I was ranked 5000+ and now 3100. By the way, I am 23 years old. Many people think that you have to start programming as a child. THEY ARE WRONG!!! I have been in contact with some 40 year olds that are attending Hack Reactor already. Most of them had no prior experience as a coder. All this info may seem more than you asked for. But, heavily compare the benefits of attending a traditional class vs online classes vs coding bootcamps and vs self learning. Classes will teach you alphabet and words (if comparing programming to learning a new language like Spanish). You have to write your own poetry, your own essay, or your own book (creating programs, working on cool projects, working for a start up, working for a big company, for a non-profit, freelancer, etc). Good luck to you and welcome to the coding life :)
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  • I would make it my job to solve as my easy coderbyte problems as possible. The more you're actual writing code and seeing the results the quicker you can wrap your brain about what's going on. Even if you can't solve a problem, you can look at other people's code and play with it.
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  • A great website to start is codecademy.com, they have course that follows a path to learn web development. start with some simple courses like HTML and CSS, then keep moving forward with jQuery, JavaScript and a cool language to learn is Ruby, easy to pick up and fun to work with. Practice a little bit every day, try to create a routine for your self where you put apart some time to go through the lessons without distractions.
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  • Hello there! I'm currently a student at Hack Reactor. I'd have to say the best resources to prepare yourself from the beginning include coderbyte as well as this site: eloquentjavascript.net/ <-- this site is AMAZING. Cheers! And never give up! Remeber to have fun!
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  • I tried codecademy and codeavengers but it didn't really stick. I'm now using Treehouse for their Javascript lessons and the videos are really nice quality. If you're a student, it's only $9 a month. I didn't know that until a couple months in after paying full price. I didn't feel Codeavengers was worth the price (when I started, most of it was free). Besides this website, if you learn Java, there's a website called Codingbat that a Stanford CS professor made that has a bunch more coding challenges like these. Help this helps!
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  • I have tried, Codeschool, CodeAcademy, Treehouse, Lynda, Coursera, Udemy, etc.. There are three great way to improve your coding chops: Online Courses: Best online introductory training program: CodeSchool. If you want to really learn something though, I'd say do a coding bootcamp. There is nothign better than coding every day to leanr the skill. Bootcamps: Hack Reactor is the way to go if you are interested in a bootcamp. I have particpated in both General Assembly and Hack Reactor and you deifnitely want to do Hack Reactor to challenge yourself. Hack Reacotr is full time though. Online Coding Challenges: Finally; for online challenges and practice, you can use Coderbyte, Codewars, CodeEval etc.. Nothing lie cahllenge yourself with problems to keep you sharp. Hope this helps and good luck.
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  • I think python is the best programming language for beginners. Because it has so many built in libraries and many 3rd party. And upon installation of a library, its just import <name> and your code runs. For example you have an isPrime() function but you want a faster isprime function, you just remove your isprime function and install the pyprimes library, and just add a line, from pyprimes import isprime as isPrime and all your existing code will be fine. just faster. and because of this characterestic, python is also powerful and flexible. Though, at some time or the other you'll feel the need of C/C++. because of the sheer speed it provides. Also, being a low-level language, you get to know how a computer works fairly well, then you can use those concepts in python to write better and then since python is a slow language, you get to improve your optimization skills. and then apply them back to C and finally you get to write libraries in C and do coding in Python to have the best of both worlds. Please note: I don't know nothing more than System.out.printIn in Java. Dont even have JDK installed
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  • Oh I mean I'm new to coding and am looking for a website that you can not only learn but create and chat for new ideas any one have nay idea what site thats free that I can use for that?
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  • You should check out Pluralsight. It's an awesome website with courses, but sadly costs a lot. I f you want something free, check out CodeSchool, a child company of Pluralsight. It's amazing and has lots of stuff for new and experienced coders. pluralsight.com codeschool.com
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  • Hello and welcome to your new obsession. Being that you are completely new to programming I would recommend looking at as many free resources on the web as possible before you go out and spend a bunch of money on books and classes. Here are a few great links. Codeacademy.com - This is a great way to get your feet wet but the instruction isn't always clear or very in depth. If your brand new to programming some of the lessons and error codes can get pretty frustrating. Codeschool.com - This is an excellent place to start!! Great instructional videos that explain everything you need to know. These are followed up with practice excercises to really hammer the concepts. Project Euler - As you get more experienced at the basic syntax of your chosen language and can solve some simple problems give these a shot. They are a bit more advanced and the problems are very mathematically based. Excellent workout for your brain! I hope some of these links help. This is an amazing world and it's very easy to become addicted!
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  • Hi man, if you really want to learn programming, first of all learn theory of programming, discrete mathematics. Then learn one of the programming languages, watch video in coursera and read read read =/
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  • If you want to be a serious programmer, go to codecademy for some introductions on HTML, CSS, Javascript, and maybe do Ruby for back-end. But if you wanna do mobile apps, go to teamtreehouse, they have a great tracks for IOS and Android that are easy to follow. The intoduction on programming also better than codecademy. If you wanna do Javascript, go to codeschool Javascript path, it's also good.
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  • If you are wanting to prepare for university you should be looking at python or java. Most intro classes uses one or the other to get the student's feet wet.
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  • .... www.codeacademy.com ..... www.w3schools.com ...those two sites will sail you smoothly into the world of programming without having to stress yourself and at not cost....try it out.....
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  • If you really wanna be a good programmer, first learn a programming language and start to solve as many problems as you can. Then you will get to understand what programming is really and then you will be able to solve probles as soon as you see them. If you have trobles choosing a programming language, go to google and search for best programming languages and choose what you like most.
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  • Been there done that. Here is my logic behind learning new program langs: First: decide which language you want to learn first. (python or ruby) would be a great starting language. just becuase syntax == beautiful :D Second, read over what these people have said. We all have gone through the stage, you are trying to overcome. Third, this is the most important!!!! *************** DO NOT GIVE UP*********** Your new best freind is google or stackoverflow. In a few weeks, you will start dreaming about coding. this is when you know, you have become a programmer(sort of). Good luck and happy coding
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